Health Information

We’re here for you

Helping you take control of your health and wellbeing.

Useful telephone numbers

Useful contact numbers and website addresses

George Eliot Hospital02476 351 351
UHCW Hospital02476 964 000
Health Visitors01827 897 520
Social Services Warwickshire01926 410 410
Warwickshire stop smoking helpline0800 085 2917
Domestic abuse helpline0800 408 1552
Mencap0808 808 1111
Atherstone memorial blood clinic02476 153 546
Family Planning Clinic Atherstone01827 712 208
Family Planning Clinic Tamworth01827 308 815
Continence Service 02476 390 032
AAA Screening (males aged 65yrs and over can self refer, will require your NHS number) 01788 663 428  
Change, Grow, Live (alcohol and substance misuse, can self refer)01926 353 513
National Dementia Helpline0300 222 1122
Alzheimer’s Society01926 888 899
Dementia UK0800 888 6678
Mind0300 123 3393
Guideposts Carer Support Service02476 385 888
Warwickshire Carer Wellbeing Service (part of Carers Trust Heart of England)02476 101040 option 4
Cruse Bereavement Care0808 808 1677
North Warwickshire Borough Council01827 715341
Crimestoppers0800 555111
Age UK Warwickshire01788 552542
National Police Non Emergency 101
RSPCA 24hour Cruelty Line0300 123499
Sue Ryder bereavement or terminal diagnosis support servicewww.sueryder.org/notalone
Health Leaflets

Stay at home if you have coronavirus symptoms

Stay at home for 7 days if you have either:

  • a high temperature – you feel hot to touch on your chest or back
  • a new, continuous cough – this means you’ve started coughing repeatedly

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

You do not need to contact 111 to tell them you’re staying at home.

Testing for coronavirus is not needed if you’re staying at home.

Read our advice about staying at home.

Urgent advice:Use the NHS 111 online coronavirus service if:

  • you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home
  • your condition gets worse
  • your symptoms do not get better after 7 days

Use the 111 coronavirus service

Only call 111 if you cannot get help online.

How coronavirus is spread

Because it’s a new illness, we do not know exactly how coronavirus spreads from person to person.

Similar viruses are spread in cough droplets.

It’s very unlikely it can be spread through things like packages or food.

How to avoid catching or spreading coronavirus

  • Do

wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 secondsalways wash your hands when you get home or into workuse hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not availablecover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneezeput used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwardstry to avoid close contact with people who are unwell

Don’t

  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

Travel advice

There are some countries and areas where there’s a higher chance of coming into contact with someone with coronavirus.

If you’re planning to travel abroad and are concerned about coronavirus, see advice for travellers on GOV.UK.

Treatment for coronavirus

There is currently no specific treatment for coronavirus.

Antibiotics do not help, as they do not work against viruses.

Treatment aims to relieve the symptoms while your body fights the illness.

You’ll need to stay in isolation, away from other people, until you have recovered.

Government response and action plan

Post, packages, take-away food

The virus does not survive well for long periods outside the body and so it is highly unlikely that 2019-nCoV can be spread through post or packages.

It is highly unlikely that 2019-nCoV can be spread through food.
Cleaning shared spaces

If a person becomes ill in a shared space, these should be cleaned using disposable cloths and household detergents. Wash your hands after cleaning.

LINKS – PATIENT INFO CORONAVIRUS

General NHS advice

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

Pituitary/ adrenal insufficiency (including steroid sick day rules)

https://www.endocrinology.org/news/item/14050/Coronavirus-advice-statement-for-patients-with-adrenal%2fpituitary-insufficiency

Underlying lung disease (British Lung Foundation)

https://www.blf.org.uk/support-for-you/coronavirus

People with Asthma

https://www.asthma.org.uk/advice/triggers/coronavirus-covid-19/

People with Diabetes

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.diabetes.org.uk/about_us/news/coronavirus%3famp .

People affected by Stroke

https://www.stroke.org.uk/news/coronavirus-information-people-affected-stroke

Pregnant women

https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/guidelines-research-services/guidelines/coronavirus-pregnancy/covid-19-virusinfection-and-pregnancy/

Children/young people T1 diabetes

People with Heart/circulatory disease

https://www.bhf.org.uk/informationsupport/heart-matters-magazine/news/coronavirus-and-your-health

Older people

https://www.ageuk.org.uk/information-advice/health-wellbeing/conditions-illnesses/coronavirus/#

Young people with anxiety

https://youngminds.org.uk/blog/what-to-do-if-you-re-anxious-about-coronavirus/

Adults with anxiety

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/

People with Rheumatoid Arthritis

https://www.nras.org.uk/news/coronavirus-what-we-know-so-far

People with cancer

https://breastcancernow.org/about-us/media/statements/advice-coronavirus-people-cancer

People with inflammatory bowel disease

https://www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk/news/updated-wuhan-novel-coronavirus-advice

Novel Coronavirus Guidance

Requests for face mask exemption letters

July 15th 2020

Re: Guidance note for patients requesting exemption letters

We are aware that some patients might be understandably anxious about the Government’s recent announcements around the use of face masks in various public settings.

GPs are unfortunately not in a position to provide individual risk assessments or letters for patients who feel that they should be exempt from wearing a face mask.

Coventry and Warwickshire Local Medical Committees have therefore prepared this guidance note as the statutory body that advises and supports all GPs and practice teams across both counties.

The government guidance on exemptions suggests there is no requirement for evidence for exemption, therefore it is sufficient for an individual to self-declare this.

Similarly, practices are under no obligation to provide letters of support for anyone who does not fall under the list of exemptions but considers themselves to have another reason to be exempted.

Current government advice on the use of face coverings can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-travel-guidance-forpassengers#face-coverings

We will pass on further guidance when this is produced by the government.

Yours sincerely Dr Andrew Warner, Chairman, Warwickshire LMC

Dr Terry Eaton, Chairman, Coventry LMC

A Joint Communication from Coventry and Warwickshire Local Medical Committees Coventry LMC: Clinical Sciences Building, UHCW NHS Trust, Clifford Bridge Rd, Coventry, CV2 2DX

Warwickshire LMC: Warwick Gates Family Health Centre, Cressida Close, Heathcote, Warwick, Warwickshire, CV34 6DZ

Requests for face mask exemption letters

We request that all patients attending the surgery during the current Covid-19 pandemic wear a face mask or suitable face covering.  This is to help stop the spread of Covid-19 and ensure the ongoing safety of both patients and staff.

Attending the surgery during Covid-19 pandemic

Requests for certification of absence from the workplace relating to covid-19 may fall into five categories:

1.       Symptomatic so isolating for seven days

Patients can and should self-certify for the first seven days as normal if they are unfit to work. They do not need to contact their GP.

2.       Symptomatic and remaining unwell for over seven days

If they remain unwell and unfit to work after seven days, the current advice is to visit www.111.nhs.uk where there is an online self-assessment tool which should be up and running soon. They do not need to contact their GP for a certificate but you can advise patients to use the template form below.

3.       Household contact symptoms so isolating for fourteen days as per government advice

GPs cannot and are not the gatekeeper of the statutory sick pay system and can only provide certificates for the purpose of illness, not in relation to government advice regarding self-isolation. Employers are responsible for putting in place arrangements for home/remote working where this is possible. Where it is not, the employee may self-certify and return to work following the relevant absence which their employer may authorise as per government advice.

4.       At risk group so following government advice

Where they do become unwell during or after this time, point 1 and 2 applies. They do not need to contact their GP.

5.       Those in full time education who are symptomatic or requiring self-isolation.

There is no NHS requirement to issue certification to schools or colleges to confirm absence. These organisations must work with parents and students to ensure that any absence is appropriately recorded, obviating the need for a ‘doctor’s note’. They do not need to contact their GP.

The current Government Guidance for employers and businesses on coronavirus (COVID-19) states;

“By law, medical evidence is not required for the first 7 days of sickness. After 7 days, employers may use their discretion around the need for medical evidence if an employee is staying at home.

We strongly suggest that employers use their discretion around the need for medical evidence for a period of absence where an employee is advised to stay at home either as they are unwell themselves, or live with someone who is, in accordance with the public health advices issued by the government.”

Until further guidance is available, Coventry and Warwickshire LMCs would suggest that practices upload the letter below to their website and requests that if needed by patients they use this letter as the practice will not provide a medical certificate for patients requiring self-isolation for coronavirus.

 Dordon & Polesworth Group Practice

162 Long Street, Dordon, Tamworth, Staffs, B78 1QA

Tel: 01827 330267 Email: [email protected]

Guidance to practices from the Local Medical Committee (LMC) to provide this letter to patients as GP Practices are not to provide sickness medical certificates for absence of work relating to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Dear Employer

Request for medical certification from absence of work related to the Covid-19 pandemic

Your employee has been absent from work from _ _ / _ _ /2020.

The reason for this is that they are following current Government and/or Public Health advice related to the Covid-19 pandemic.  Specifically, this is because;

 c  They are symptomatic (7 days) 

c  They are symptomatic and continue to be after seven days

c  Date fit to return to work (where applicable) _ _ / _ _ / 2020

c  A household contact is symptomatic so they are required to self-isolate (14 days)

c  They are following government advice for high risk patients as they suffer with:

 Above section completed by patient.

Due to the current pandemic and pressure on General Practice, we are prioritising the urgent medical needs of our patients and will not be providing a medical certificate for this absence.

By law employers may use their discretion around the need for medical evidence if an employee is absent from work for more than seven days due to sickness. We would ask you to apply this discretion to help support NHS general practice provide care for our population rather than being asked to fulfil unnecessary administrative tasks.

Should you decide on taking disciplinary action against an employee purely on the grounds of being unable to provide the sickness medical certification relating to Covid-19 pandemic we would make it very clear in any disciplinary/grievance/tribunal reports that under the circumstances we would deem your action inappropriate. 

Many thanks for your assistance during this challenging time 

Dordon & Polesworth Group Practice

Requests for certification of absence from the workplace relating to Covid-19

A volunteer home delivery service is being provided during the current Covid-19 pandemic for identified High Risk Vulnerable patients.  The Practice has contact details for volunteers in all dispensing areas.

Practice Dispensing Home Delivery Service during Covid-19
PHE Covid-19 vaccine guide for adults information

The UK vaccination programme has been very successful with more than 30 million people vaccinated and more than 6,000 lives already saved.

What is the concern?

Recently there have been reports of a very rare condition involving blood clots and unusual bleeding after vaccination. This is being carefully reviewed but the risk factors for this condition are not yet clear.

Although this condition remains extremely rare there appears to be a higher risk in people who have had the first dose of the AstraZeneca (AZ) vaccine. Around 4 people develop this condition for every million doses of AZ vaccine doses given.

This is seen slightly more often in younger people and tends to occur between 4 days and 2 weeks following vaccination.

This condition can also occur naturally, and clotting problems are a common complication of COVID-19 infection. An increased risk has not yet been seen after other COVID-19 vaccines but is being carefully monitored.

Benefits and risks of the vaccination

AgeRisk from COVID-19Benefit of vaccinationRisk of vaccination
Over 50 years of age or having underlying medical conditionsLow – catching infection, passing on infection1 dose – more than 80% reduction: deaths, hospitalisation, intensive careUncommon – sore arm, feeling tired, headache, general aches, flu like symptoms
 Moderate – Long COVID2 doses – more than 95% reduction: deathsExtremely rare – clotting problems
 Very high – hospitalisation, intensive care admission, death  
30 to 49 years of ageLow – hospitalisation, intensive care admission, death1 dose – between 60% and 70% reduction: catching infection, passing on infectionCommon – sore arm, feeling tired, headache, general aches, flu like symptoms
 Moderate – Long COVID2 doses – more than 85% reduction: catching and passing on infectionExtremely rare – clotting problems
 High – catching mild infection, passing on infection  
18 to 29 years of ageVery low – hospitalisation, intensive care admission, death1 dose – between 60% and 70% reduction: catching infection, passing on infectionVery common – sore arm, feeling tired, headache, general aches, flu like symptoms
 Moderate – Long COVID2 doses – more than 85% reduction: catching and passing on infectionExtremely rare – clotting problems
 Very high – catching mild infection, passing on infection  

What to look out for after vaccination

Although serious side effects are very rare, if you experience any of the following from around 4 days to 4 weeks after vaccination you should seek medical advice urgently:

  • a new, severe headache which is not helped by usual painkillers or is getting worse
  • a headache which seems worse when lying down or bending over
  • an unusual headache that may be accompanied by:
    • blurred vision, nausea and vomiting
    • difficulty with your speech
    • weakness, drowsiness or seizures
  • new, unexplained pinprick bruising or bleeding
  • shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling or persistent abdominal pain

What you should do next

Over 50 years of age or with underlying medical conditions

All older adults (including health and social care workers over 50 years of age), care home residents, health and social care workers (includes unpaid carers and family members of those who are immunosuppressed) and adults with certain medical conditions were prioritised in the first phase of the programme because they were at high risk of the complications of COVID-19.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advises that you should still receive any of the available COVID-19 vaccines. The benefits of vaccination in protecting you against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition. You should also complete your course with the same vaccine you had for the first dose.

If your first dose was with AZ vaccine without suffering any serious side effects you should have the second dose on time as you may still be at high risk of the complications of COVID-19. Having the second dose will give you higher and longer lasting protection.

If you are a healthy person over 30 to 50 years of age

The MHRA and the JCVI advises that all adults in this age group (including health and social care workers) should still receive any of the available COVID-19 vaccines.

The benefits of vaccination in protecting you against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition. You should also complete your course with the same vaccine you had for the first dose.

If you are a healthy younger person aged 18 to 39

The MHRA and the JCVI advises that all adults in this age group (including health and social care workers) should still receive any of the available COVID-19 vaccines. The benefits of vaccination in protecting you against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition. You should also complete your course with the same vaccine you had for the first dose.

Currently JCVI has advised that it is preferable for people under 30 to have a vaccine other than AZ. If you choose to have another COVID-19 vaccine you may have to wait to be protected. You may wish to go ahead with the AZ vaccination after you have considered all the risks and benefits for you.

About the second dose

If you have already had a first dose of AZ vaccine without suffering any serious side effects you should complete the course. This includes people aged 18 to 29 years who are health and social care workers, unpaid carers and family members of those who are immunosuppressed. It is expected that the first dose of the vaccine will have given you some protection, particularly against severe disease.

Further information can be found at NHS.UK.

Covid-19 vaccination and blood clots